Globalizing Music Education: A Framework

By Alexandra Kertz-Welzel | Go to book overview

3
Developing a Global Mindset

GLOBALIZATION AND INTERNATIONALIZATION affect music education worldwide. They challenge our common notions of music teaching and learning and require transformations on the institutional, the pedagogical, and the individual levels. Most of all, we have to learn how to come to terms with diversity. We need to address it in research and teaching, helping our students learn to deal with the multiplicity of music education and research cultures around the globe. While this is certainly no easy task, music education is not the first discipline to face these challenges. Research from various fields such as intercultural education can help in developing concepts for music education with regard to transcultural competence or a global mindset. It is important to develop these competencies to globalize music education in a way not only embracing diversity but also using its benefits.

This chapter investigates what it means to be global, with regard to three conceptual elements: international music education policy, the music classroom, and the global mindset. They illustrate ways of shaping the formation of a united and diverse global music education community in terms of globalizing music education.


International Music Education Policy

There seems to be one global commonality among music educators with which everybody who has spent some time working in schools is familiar: many music teachers like to complain about administration, curricula, teaching duties, salary, the constant need for justification, or a lack of acknowledgment. This global discontent of music educators raises questions: Who is responsible for the bad state of affairs? Why do music educators worldwide think they are helpless and blame somebody else for their daily problems? What should be changed so that music educators feel empowered and would have opportunities to transform the system they are working in? These and many more issues are part of the field of music education policy. It is concerned with administrative and political aspects of music education but also aims at empowering music teachers to be part of decision-making processes in order to transform their labor conditions. Reconsidering music education policy in view of globalization is therefore crucial and can facilitate globalizing music education.

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Globalizing Music Education: A Framework
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Globalization and Internationalization 17
  • 2 - Thinking Globally in Music Education Research 35
  • 3 - Developing a Global Mindset 80
  • Conclusion 111
  • Bibliography 117
  • Index 129
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