Globalizing Music Education: A Framework

By Alexandra Kertz-Welzel | Go to book overview

Conclusion

THIS BOOK PROPOSES the vision of a united yet diverse and culturally sensitive global music education community. For addressing the challenges that we face today, we need to unite our efforts and use the strengths we have as a multifaceted global community. This is what globalizing music education means. But globalizing music education is not something that can be done easily. Rather, this is a call for transforming music education. By acknowledging the many music education and research cultures, the notion of globalizing music education challenges the current state of music education worldwide—for instance, the so-far unquestioned hegemony of Anglo-American music education.

This book attempts to raise awareness for shaping international music education in a culturally sensitive way, trying to empower everybody who is interested to be a part of it. It presents a critical yet positive vision of music education, trying to overcome idealistic and simplified notions of globalization and internationalization. But it does not attempt to offer a comprehensive description of music education or research traditions in different countries. Rather, this book provides a conceptual framework, suggesting a theoretical structure of categories and conceptual elements that could facilitate globalizing music education. It breaks down the impact of globalization and internationalization on music education in selective categories presented in its chapters. At the same time, through these categories, it develops the notion of what globalizing music education could mean.

The framework presented in this book can be a tool for understanding, evaluating, and shaping globalizing music education in a culturally sensitive way. Through providing such a conceptual framework, this book also contributes to the methodology of comparative and international music education. However, when considering the global music education community, it is important to point out that, no matter what unites us, there are also differences. We should acknowledge and not ignore them. They are a significant part of who we are as a vivid, diverse, and creative global community. Keeping the imbalance alive regarding appreciating that we are similar but also different helps remind us that international encounters are always intercultural encounters, no matter how uniform we seem to be. Acknowledging that we need intercultural knowledge and competencies can facilitate a creative and transformative international dialogue, supporting the further formation of an inclusive and diverse global community.

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Globalizing Music Education: A Framework
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Globalization and Internationalization 17
  • 2 - Thinking Globally in Music Education Research 35
  • 3 - Developing a Global Mindset 80
  • Conclusion 111
  • Bibliography 117
  • Index 129
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