Guns and Society in Colonial Nigeria: Firearms, Culture, and Public Order

By Saheed Aderinto | Go to book overview

3
“A DANE GUN IS USELESS WITHOUT GUNPOWDER”
The Political Economy of Nigeria’s Most Popular Explosive

Gunpowder was the main ammunition for firing the Dane gun, the most popular firearm in colonial Nigeria. Without the liberalization of the trade in gunpowder, the Nigerian gun society would not have emerged. Hunting, which provided a means of livelihood and food, would have suffered greatly, and the firing of guns at ceremonies and festivals, which increasingly became a marker of social status, would have been negatively affected. Neither would cocoa growers, among other cash crop farmers, who used the Dane gun for self-defense against thieves and dangerous wild animals, have been able to use their firearms. Thus, gunpowder was a commodity whose impact reverberated in many areas of people’s everyday lives and at different levels of their engagement with their society and the colonial state. In fact, the story of gunpowder, unlike the Dane gun, is that of global economic dependency: 99 percent of Nigeria’s gunpowder came from abroad.1 In 1923, this indispensable item accounted for one-fourth of all imported goods.2 Thus, the history of both firearms and gunpowder cannot be disaggregated, for together they reflected the desire of the colonial government to profit from an item that was in high demand for a variety of purposes.

In addition to shedding additional light on the dynamics of Nigeria’s gun society from the perspective of gunpowder trade, this chapter complements the historiography of World War II. The political and economic history of the war has examined the structural crisis of the period, which manifested in the shortage of essential imported items, including salt.3 Rationing of foreign and locally produced items alike intensified public disorder as the government militarized markets and trading centers in response

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Guns and Society in Colonial Nigeria: Firearms, Culture, and Public Order
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.