Guns and Society in Colonial Nigeria: Firearms, Culture, and Public Order

By Saheed Aderinto | Go to book overview

6
A FEARFUL WEAPON
Violent Crime and Gun Accidents in Everyday Nigeria

A stage has been reached where we feel the use of firearms in certain
provincial areas should be partially restricted by the Native Authorities,
if the citizens of this country would continue to enjoy life, unhaunted
by the spectre of insecurity. Early this week, we published the doleful
news of the untimely death of a damsel at Okigwi whose life has
been cut away by those who mistook her for a thief. And even before
this, we had published several other items bearing on where one
person or another had been mistaken for a game and shot dead.

—“These Gun Shot Accidents!” Eastern Nigeria Guardian, May 7, 1948

“Darkness was around the corner, and the burial was near. Guns fired the last salute and the cannon rent the sky.”1 Chinua Achebe used these statements in his classic Things Fall Apart to describe the frenzied atmosphere at the closing of the funeral ceremony of Chief Ezeudu, the oldest man and one of the most decorated chiefs in the village of Umuofia. The events following this carnival-like scene were a calamity. Okonkwo, the main character of the novel, accidentally kills a sixteen-year-old teenager and son of the deceased during the sporadic shooting that was characteristic of numerous ceremonies and rites in Igboland, as elsewhere in Nigeria. The circumstances leading to the gun accident in Things Fall Apart adequately mirror the realities of the time. Big and strong men like Okonkwo who had never fired a shot decided to extend the sphere of their superior masculinity to the use of firearms. But Chief Ezeudu’s funeral accident was not the first time Okonkwo would be involved in an incident of gun violence. He nearly

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Guns and Society in Colonial Nigeria: Firearms, Culture, and Public Order
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.