The Wrong Hands: Popular Weapons Manuals and Their Historic Challenges to a Democratic Society

By Ann Larabee | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

My greatest thanks go to Randy Scott, of Michigan State University Library archives, and the staff in the Interlibrary Loan section. Many of the documents I viewed were difficult to obtain. Special thanks go to David Foreman, who allowed me special access to his papers at the Denver Public Library, and to Yvonne Creamer, who got me there. I had an invaluable discussion with Jason Scott, who has collected many of the old BBS textfiles and has great insight into those early days of the Internet. William Powell was willing to correspond with me about his sources for The Anarchist Cookbook. My best intellectual companion has been Arthur Versluis, editor of the Journal for the Study of Radicalism, who has always strived for balance and sensitive observation. David McBride, of Oxford University Press, was a thoughtful editor and gave many invaluable comments on the manuscript. The anonymous reviewers provided much helpful advice. Richard Bach Jensen shared my enthusiasm for the project and liked to talk about historical anarchism and policing. Randall Law urged me to think about terrorism and technology in a broader context. With his probing mind, Paul Sunstein helped me work out my conclusions. At the eleventh hour, Ronen Steinberg provided me with a few crucial insights. Thanks to Beverly Gage, Claudia Verhoeven, and Carola Dietz, the “terror chicks,” for encouraging me from the beginning. This book is built on the work of many fine scholars, too numerous to mention, who have lately been thinking about the histories and consequences of wars on terror. I also owe special thanks to Lissa Blon-Jacot, Jay Jacot, and Maksen Kai Mecher for giving me the moral support, the meals, and the writing space to get the job done.

-ix-

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The Wrong Hands: Popular Weapons Manuals and Their Historic Challenges to a Democratic Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Science of Revolutionary Warfare 15
  • 2 - Sabotage 36
  • 3 - The Anarchist Cookbook 64
  • 4 - Hitmen 90
  • 5 - Monkeywrenching 108
  • 6 - Ka Fucking Boom 131
  • 7 - Vast Libraries of Jihad and Revolution 152
  • 8 - Weapons of Mass Destruction 171
  • Conclusion 185
  • Notes 191
  • Selected Bibliography 221
  • Index 239
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