Transitions in End of Life Care: Hospice and Related Developments in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

By David Clark; Michael Wright et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

The idea for this review came about over the dinner table at a palliative care leadership meeting in the Central European University, Budapest in September 2000. The project began in January 2001 and we named it PaCE, as a simple acronym for Palliative Care in Eastern Europe. Throughout our work we have been grateful for the interest and support of Dr Kathleen Foley and of Mary Callaway from the Project on Death in America, and for the funding support of the Open Society Institute, New York. We hope that our efforts have matched their expectations.

Many other colleagues and organizations have helped us along the way. Staff at the European Observatory on Health Care Systems have been generous with their advice and in supplying materials. David Joranson and Karen Ryan at the WHO Collaborating Center for Policy and Communications in Cancer Care, University of Wisconsin, have been considerate and supportive in introducing us to the choppy waters of opioid availability.

Exceptionally, several individuals have given extensive and crucial help at vital moments. In several different countries, Barbara Ravnik, Urska Lunder, Katalin Hegedus, Tomasz Dangel, Daniela Mosoiu, Malina Dumitrescu, Mariana Pernea, Maciej Kluziak, and Anica Jusic were unstinting in their help with important data. Katya Petrova gave translation help in St Petersburg. In the UK, Wendy Jones, Michael Siggs, and Sue Beven were always willing to give information, advice and guidance about hospice and palliative care developments in Russia and elsewhere. In Sweden we have enjoyed close co-operation with Carl Johan Fürst and Sylvia Sauter, who generously shared their questionnaire data with us.

In particular, Professor Jacek Łuczak, of the Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, in Poland, has been unstinting in his help with the project. Much of the material we report was not only gathered

-xi-

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Transitions in End of Life Care: Hospice and Related Developments in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Editor’s Preface vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - Introduction- Background, Aims and Methods of the Review 1
  • 2 - Epidemiological and Policy Considerations 11
  • 3 - Palliative Care Developments across the Region 18
  • 4 - Palliative Care Beacons 176
  • 5 - Conclusions and Recommendations 269
  • Index 292
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