The Book of American Negro Poetry: Chosen and Edited, with an Essay on the Negro's Creative Genius

By James Weldon Johnson | Go to book overview

George Reginald Margetson

STANZAS FROM
THE FLEDGLING BARD AND THE POETRY
SOCIETY

Part I

I’m out to find the new, the modern school,
Where Science trains the fledgling bard to fly,
Where critics teach the ignorant, the fool,
To write the stuff the editors would buy;
It matters not e’en tho it be a lie,—
Just so it aims to smash tradition’s crown
And build up one instead decked with a new renown.

A thought is haunting me by night and day,
And in some safe archive I seek to lay it ;
I have some startling thing I wish to say,
And they can put me wise just how to say it.
Without their aid, I, like the ass, must bray it,
Without due knowledge of its mood and tense,
And so ‘tis sure to fail the bard to recompense.

Will some kind one direct me to that college
Where every budding genius now is headed,
The only source to gain poetic knowledge,
Where all the sacred truths lay deep imbedded,

-69-

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The Book of American Negro Poetry: Chosen and Edited, with an Essay on the Negro's Creative Genius
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface vii
  • Paul Laurence Dunbar 3
  • James Edwin Campbell 17
  • James D. Corrothers 27
  • Daniel Webster Davis 39
  • William H. a. Moore 43
  • W. E. Burghardt Du Bois 49
  • George Marion McClellan 55
  • William Stanley Braithwaite 59
  • George Reginald Margetson 69
  • James Weldon Johnson 73
  • John Wesley Holloway 93
  • Leslie Pinckney Hill 101
  • Edward Smyth Jones 107
  • Ray G. Dandridge 109
  • Fenton Johnson 117
  • R. Nathaniel Dett 125
  • Georgia Douglas Johnson 127
  • Claude McKay 133
  • Joseph S. Cotter, Jr 151
  • Roscoe C. Jamison 159
  • Jessie Fauset 161
  • Anne Spencer 167
  • Alex Rogers 175
  • Waverley Turner Carmichael 181
  • Alice Dunbar-Nelson 183
  • Charles Bertram Johnson 185
  • Otto Leland Bohanan 189
  • Theodore Henry Shackelford 191
  • Lucian B. Watkins 193
  • Benjamin Brawley 197
  • Joshua Henry Jones, Jr 201
  • Appendix 203
  • Appendix 205
  • Biographical Index of Authors 209
  • Index of Titles 215
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