Sexual Behavior in the Human Male

By Alfred C. Kinsey; Wardell B. Pomeroy et al. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

First of all, acknowledgment should be made to the 12,000 persons who have contributed histories, and particularly to the 5300 males who have provided the data on which the present volume is based. These persons represent each and every age, from children to the oldest groups; they represent every social level, of several racial groups. If these persons had not helped there would have been no study. It has taken considerable courage for many of them to discuss such intimate aspects of their histories, and to risk their confidences with the scientific investigators. They have contributed in order that there should be an increase in our knowledge of this important aspect of human biology and sociology. It is unfortunate that we cannot name each and every one involved. Those who have spent time in persuading their friends to cooperate have contributed in a very special way; and to them we are especially indebted for devoted and effective service.

Herman B. Wells, the President of Indiana University, Fernandus Payne, Dean of the Graduate School of the University, the Trustees, and others in the Administration of the University have constantly encouraged, materially supported, and stoutly defended the importance of this research.

The Rockefeller Foundation has contributed a major portion of the cost of the program during the past six years. Dr. Alan Gregg, as Director for the Medical Sciences of The Foundation, has encouraged a wide-scale, long-time project which would adequately cover all social levels and all aspects of sexual behavior in our society.

The National Research Council’s Committee for Research on Problems of Sex, as a part of the Medical Division of the Council, has administered the funds granted by The Rockefeller Foundation. It has encouraged and advised on many aspects of the research. Especial mention should be made of the cordial support given by Dr. Robert M. Yerkes, who has served as Chairman of the Research Council’s Committee since its inception more than twenty-five years ago. Under Dr. Yerkes’ guidance the Committee has contributed to a long list of notable projects on the sex endocrines; on the behavior of chimpanzees at the Yerkes Laboratories at Orange Park, Florida; on the behavior of lower mammals, particularly under the direction of Dr. Frank A. Beach, formerly at the American Museum of Natural History and now at Yale University; and on the human studies which were published by Peck and Wells (1923, 1925), by Hamilton (1929), by Katherine Davis (1929), by Terman et al. (1938), by Landis (1940, 1942), and by still others.

-vii-

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