For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq

By Ayça Çubukçu | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The World Tribunal on Iraq and its global network of activists have been parts of my life for more than fifteen years. First and foremost, I thank them. According to anthropological tradition—for better or worse—most remain nameless.

When working on the tribunal, I traveled to Paris and Athens for the European Social Forum, and to Mumbai for the World Social Forum. I went to Brussels and Kyoto, Tokyo and Hiroshima for the tribunal sessions there (on my way to Rome, I was denied a visa). I thank all my hosts during these travels.

Without the support of my academic community, this book would exist not. I thank Partha Chatterjee in particular, as well as Talal Asad, Nicholas De Genova, Richard Falk, and Brinkley Messick. Robin D. G. Kelley encouraged this work from the beginning, as did Susan Buck-Morss. With her, the late Benedict Anderson of Cornell University walked me into further studies at Columbia. I am grateful to them all.

Geoff Waite, Gil Anidjar, and Biju Mathew read the manuscript multiple times. Müge Gürsöy Sökmen, Sinja Graff, Asad Ahmed, Ayşe Berktay, Siddhartha Deb, and Anna Bernard went through it once. Anthony Alessandrini, Sinan Hoşadam, Mehmet Tabak, Elena Loizidou, and Gerry Simpson commented on parts. My sincerest thanks to them.

Stefanos Geroulanos, Başak Ertür, Adriana Garriga-López, Claudia Garriga-López, Adhamar Ahmad, Jeni Wightman, Rahul Govind, David Graeber, Aashti Bhartia, Anjali Kamat, Esra Özyürek, Onur Ulaş İnce, Mutaamba Maasha, Gökçeçiçek Tatlarlı Oruç, Zeynep Dadak, Enis Köstepen, Awol Allo, Vidya Kumar, Gary Wilder, and Ali Bektaş offered friendship during the long years it took to research and write this book. For them, I am grateful.

Yasmina El Khoury, Biju Mathew, Balam Kenter, Hovik and Gagik

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