Political Blackness in Multiracial Britain

By Mohan Ambikaipaker | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Academics are not born but made through encouragement, opportunity, and support. I am grateful to have had many people who have advocated on my behalf and who have supported my journey. I would like to express a deep appreciation to the many institutions, people, and overlapping communities, stretching across several countries that have made this work possible.

This book project was funded in part by the Wenner-Gren Foundation’s award of a fieldwork grant and a University Continuing Fellowship at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) that enabled time for writing. Publication of this book was also funded by a subvention grant awarded by the School of Liberal Arts at Tulane University. The John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies supported research through the award of multiple grants and fellowships both prior to and after fieldwork, and, most important, it provided the rare space where race and racism and the African diaspora could be rigorously thought about and debated intellectually. The Center for Asian American Studies at UT also enabled me to develop my own courses on black and Asian social movements and activist anthropological research. This was an invaluable opportunity and a clear reason why critical ethnic studies centers and programs are indispensable spaces for forms of knowledge production and teaching that otherwise would not take place.

In Britain, the opportunity to work with the Runnymede Trust in producing a major research report was a defining experience. I would like to thank Michelynn Laflèche, Robert Berkeley, Omar Khan, and Ros Spry for supporting my work there. Similarly, I am unable to forget the generosity of the late Stuart Hall, who facilitated introductions at the Centre for Urban and Community Research at Goldsmiths College. I want to especially thank its director at the time, Michael Keith, for the Centre’s support and for engaging with my research project during his time as leader of the Tower

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