101 Activities for Delivering Knock Your Socks off Service

By Jill Applegate; Ann Thomas | Go to book overview

OUR THANKS

As with any book, its creation cannot be ascribed solely to its authors; many people played a role in its completion.

This book came about because of you! So many of our clients and seminar participants kept asking us, “Can you give us more?” “How can we follow up on this seminar on a weekly basis?” “We need to reinforce this training—what can we do?” and on and on. You would no longer be denied! So, a special thankyou goes to each and every seminar and workshop attendee who demanded this book be written!

Editor extraordinaire, Dave Zielinski, once again exceeded expectations with his careful attention to the Knock Your Socks Off flavor and styling. Thanks, Dave—we can’t imagine doing one of these without you!

We are so pleased to once again include illustrations from the late John Bush. John left us way too soon in 2006, but we could not have a Socks Off book without him. We spent hours going through the art that John so carefully created for the previous books, and were blown away once again by his engaging wit and his unique ability to capture exactly what we were looking for. This book includes the “Best Of” John’s work, and we are grateful to Nancy Bush for generously allowing us to reprint them.

Ellen Kadin has been our editor with AMACOM for many years. It’s comforting to know she’s just a phone call or an e-mail away. We value her role and expertise—and she coordinates a fabulous AMACOM team.

A very special thank-you to Susan Zemke, whose enthusiasm and excitement for this book is so appreciated. We are grateful to Susan for her constant support and commitment to keeping Ron’s legacy at the fore.

Ann thanks her husband, Jim, for his patience, and her girls for their “You go, Mom!” enthusiasm. She’d also like to thank her co-author for all the little “pushes” along the way to make our deadlines.

Jill thanks her family for their love and continual support throughout this process and all her endeavors. She’d also like to give a special shout out to Russ Rolinger, who gave her her first foray in customer service by hiring her as a high school waitress many years ago!

-xi-

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