Biotechnology and Culture: Bodies, Anxieties, Ethics

By Paul E. Brodwin | Go to book overview

Biotechnology and Culture: Bodies, Anxieties, Ethics

is Volume 25 in the series

THEORIES OF CONTEMPORARY CULTURE
CENTER FOR 21ST CENTURY STUDIES
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE

Kathleen Woodward, General Editor

Nothing in Itself: Complexions of Fashion Herbert Blau

Figuring Age: Women, Bodies, Generations Edited by Kathleen Woodward

Electronic Culture: Fictions of the Present Tense in Television, Media Art, and Virtual Worlds
Margaret Morse

Ethics after Idealism: TheoryCultureEthnicityReading Rey Chow

Too Soon Too Late: History in Popular Culture, 1972–1996 Meaghan Morris

The Mirror and the Killer-Queen: Otherness in Literary Language Gabriele Schwab

Re-viewing Reception: Television, Gender, and Postmodern Culture Lynne Joyrich

Pedagogy: The Question of Impersonation Edited by Jane Gallop

Fugitive Images: From Photography to Video Edited by Patrice Petro

Displacements: Cultural Identities in Question Edited by Angelika Bammer

Libidinal Economy Jean-François Lyotard

Aging and Its Discontents: Freud and Other Fictions Kathleen Woodward

Indiscretions: Avant-garde Film, Video, and Feminism Patricia Mellencamp

Logics of Television: Essays in Cultural Criticism Edited by Patricia Mellencamp

The Remasculinization of America: Gender and the Vietnam War Susan Jeffords

The Eye of Prey: Subversions of the Postmodern Herbert Blau

Feminist Studies/Critical Studies Edited by Teresa de Lauretis

Studies in Entertainment: Critical Approaches to Mass Culture Edited by Tania Modleski

Memory and Desire: AgingLiteraturePsychoanalysis
Edited by Kathleen Woodward and Murray M. Schwartz

Displacement: Derrida and After Edited by Mark Krupnick

Innovation/Renovation: New Perspectives on the Humanities
Edited by Ihab Hassan and Sally Hassan

The Technological Imagination: Theories and Fictions
Edited by Teresa de Lauretis, Andreas Huyssen, and Kathleen Woodward

The Myths of Information: Technology and Postindustrial Culture Edited by Kathleen Woodward

Performance and Postmodern Culture Edited by Michel Benamou and Charles Caramello

-ii-

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