Biotechnology and Culture: Bodies, Anxieties, Ethics

By Paul E. Brodwin | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

PAUL E. BRODWIN is associate professor of anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and adjunct assistant professor of bioethics at the Medical College of Wisconsin. He is the author of Medicine and Morality in Haiti: The Contest for Healing Power (1996) and the coeditor (with Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Byron J. Good, and Arthur Kleinman) of Pain as Human Experience: An Anthropological Perspective (1992).

LISA CARTWRIGHT is associate professor of visual and cultural studies and English at the University of Rochester. She is the author of Screening the Body: Tracing Medicine’s Visual Culture (1995), the coauthor (with Marita Sturken) of Practices of Looking (2000), and the coeditor (with Paula A. Treichler and Constance Penley) of The Visible Woman: Imaging Technologies, Gender, and Science (1998).

THOMAS J. CSORDAS, professor of anthropology at Case Western Reserve University, is the author of Language, Charisma, and Creativity: The Ritual Life of a Religious Movement (1997) and The Sacred Self: A Cultural Phenomenology of Charismatic Healing(1994), as well as the editor of Embodiment and Experience: The Existential Ground of Culture and Self (1994). He is preparing a book comparing styles of religious healing in contemporary Navajo society and pursuing work on the relation between religion and globalization.

GILLIAN M. GOSLINGA-ROY is a doctoral candidate in the History of Consciousness Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. The producer and director of several ethnographic documentaries, she currently is preparing for dissertation field research in South India on local practices of assisted reproduction and pre-producing her next ethnographic film, “The Wives of Pandi,” about a deity reputed for his powers to grant infertile women children.

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