Colonial Revivals: The Nineteenth-Century Lives of Early American Books

By Lindsay Dicuirci | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book is the result of many gifts over many years by many people. First, I thank my mentors at Ohio State who encouraged my interest in book history and early American literature. Harvey Graff, Susan Williams, and Jared Gardner were brilliant readers of my work and models of generosity. I am ever indebted to Beth Hewitt, whose wisdom and kindness shaped not only this project but the course of my professional life. I am thankful for the years of camaraderie with Meghan Burke Hattaway, Erin Kelly, and Shannon Thomas. Alexis Stern Martina remains a cherished source of wise counsel and caloric snacks. A research fellowship at the Massachusetts Historical Society in 2009 gave me my first opportunity to work in an archive, and it changed the trajectory of my career. I thank Conrad Wright, Peter Drummey, and Jeremy Dibbell for guiding a novice through that wonderful collection. The McNeil Center’s Material Texts program and workshop connected me with a network of some of the best thinkers and writers I know, including Matt Brown, Kate Gaudet, and Molly O’Hagan Hardy. Molly’s brilliant insights and faithful friendship are imprinted on this book. My research benefited tremendously from a William Reese Company Fellowship in Book History at the Library Company of Philadelphia, and from Jim Green’s font of knowledge. As the recipient of the Stephen Botein Fellowship in Book History at the American Antiquarian Society, I was overwhelmed with the richness of the AAS collections and the staff’s depth of knowledge. Tom Knoles, Lauren Hewes, and Ashley Cataldo were particularly helpful in finding the strange antiquarian curiosities that are the bedrock of my work. My fellow Regent Streeters made my time there even stranger, in the best sense.

A portion of Chapter 2 appeared as “Reviving Puritan History: Evangelicalism, Antiquarianism, and Mather’s Magnalia in Antebellum America” in Early American Literature 45, no. 3 (2010). A version of Chapter 5 was printed as “The Spanish Archive and the Remapping of U.S. History in Washington Irving’s Columbus” in Urban Identity and the Atlantic World, ed.

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