The Death of Character: Perspectives on Theater after Modernism

By Elinor Fuchs | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto (New York: International, 19+8), p. 12.

2. Charles Jencks, What Is Post-Modernism? (New York: St. Martin’s, 1986), p. 19.

3. Premiere, February 8, 1973, the Joffrey Ballet, Chicago. See Twyla Tharp, Push Comes to Shove (New York: Bantam, 1992), pp. 184-85.

4. Kathleen Hulley, “Transgressing Genre: Kathy Acker’s Intertext,” Robert Con Davis and Patrick O’Donnell, eds., Intertextuality and Contemporary American Fiction (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1988), pp. 171-90, 177-78.

5. Guy Debord, Society of the Spectacle (Detroit: Black & Red, 1983), #9.

6. Jean Baudrillard, The Mirror of Production, trans, and intro. Mark Poster (St. Louis: Telos, 1975), pp. 122, 126, 128. See also Steven Best and Douglas Kellner, Postmodern Theory: Critical Interrogations (New York: Guilford, 1991), p. 53-

7. Fredric Jameson, Postmodernism, or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism (Durham: Duke University Press, 1991). See esp. pp. 410-15.

8. Roland Barthes, Roland Barthes, trans. Richard Howard (New York: Hill and Wang, 1977), p. 168.

9. Craig Owens, “The Discourse of Others: Feminists and Postmodernism” (Port Townsend, Washington: Bay, 1983), pp. 57-82.

10. Les immatériaux, Editions du Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, 1985.

11. As I write, Peter Sellars has worked a similar change on The Merchant of Venice. David Richards’s New York Times review of October 18, 1994 (p. C18), states that this production “dismantle(s) characters’ psyches and spread(s) out all the pieces for us to examine…. Rather than address each other, the characters often talk into the microphones that stand at either side of the stage and sit on the various tables.”

12. See “Reviews and Articles,” pp. 161-64.

13. Des McAnuff, Leave It to Beaver Is Dead, in Mac Wellman, ed., Theatre of Wonders (Los Angeles: Sun and Moon, 1985), p. 135. The reader should be cautioned that the play appears here without the lyrics of the songs that constituted a third act of the play, and without any indication that the dramatic action was followed by a concert.

14. Ibid., pp. 135 and 219.

15. Unpublished ms. provided by the author.

16. Beaver, pp. 180 and 206.

17. New York Times, April 4, 1979, p. C20.

18. Bruce Wilshire, Role Playing and Identity: The Limits of Theatre as Metaphor (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1982), pp. 42-43.

19. See “Reviews and Articles,” pp. 169-76.

20. This quotation from Toynbee has proved as elusive as it is well known. Akizuki Ryomin (New Mahayana: Buddhism for a Postmodern World,” trans. James Heisig and Paul Swanson [Berkeley: Asian Humanities Press, 1990]) renders it as follows: “When historians a thousand years hence look back on the 20th century and ask what was most distinctive about it,

-199-

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The Death of Character: Perspectives on Theater after Modernism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Drama and Performance Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I- Modern after Modernism 19
  • 1- The Rise and Fall of the Character Named Character 21
  • 2- Pattern over Character the Modern Mysterium 36
  • 3- Counter-Stagings Ibsen against the Grain 52
  • Part II- Theater after Modernism 67
  • 4- Signaling through the Signs 69
  • 5- Another Version of Pastoral 92
  • 6- When Bad Girls Play Good Theaters 108
  • 7- Theater as Shopping 128
  • 8- Postmodernism and the Scene of Theater 144
  • Reviews and Articles 1979-1993 Reports from an Emerging Culture 159
  • Notes 199
  • Index 218
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