Circuit Riders for Mental Health: The Hogg Foundation in Twentieth-Century Texas

By William S. Bush | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book began as a vague idea over a decade ago during conversations with King Davis, a member of my dissertation committee at the University of Texas and at that time the executive director of the Hogg Foundation. He persuaded me that an untold story of mental health reform called for historical attention. Other projects beckoned, however, and I put this one aside at that time.

Years later, I returned to this project with the support of a grant from the Hogg Foundation. I owe a tremendous debt to the Foundation, its leadership, and its staff for their constant support and, importantly, their respect for my freedom to follow the source materials wherever they led. In particular, Octavio Martinez, Lynda Frost, and Dan Oppenheimer have given unflagging support throughout the conception, research, and writing of this book. Lynda Frost’s feedback on early chapter drafts proved invaluable. I cannot express my gratitude strongly enough to the ex-staff members who generously shared their personal and professional memories with me during lengthy oral interviews: Wayne Holtzman, Louise and the late Ira Iscoe, Ralph Culler, Reymundo Rodriguez, Robert Leon, Adrian Fowler, and King Davis. I am also grateful for the generosity of Lucille DiDomenico of Philanthropy Southwest (formerly the Conference of Southwest Foundations), who shared documents and photographs in addition to her reminiscences.

My deepest gratitude goes to Victoria Hill, my former colleague in the Department of American Studies at the University of Texas, who served as a research assistant on this project. Vicky and I collaborated closely on the archival research for this project and held numerous extended discussions about the larger questions raised by our source materials. She offered indispensable insights into the history of psychology, the politics of mental health, and the ways in which race and gender surfaced throughout the drama of mental health reform in Texas. Because this book draws heavily on archival records, it has depended crucially on the assistance of archivists and library

-xi-

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Circuit Riders for Mental Health: The Hogg Foundation in Twentieth-Century Texas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - Out of Sight, out of Mind 1
  • 1 - "A Mental Health Program for the People of Texas" 9
  • 2 - Spreading the Gospel of Mental Health in the 1940s and 1950s 29
  • 3 - "A Real Revolution in Mental Health Concepts" 56
  • 4 - Branching out 85
  • 5 - "This Most Urgent of All Health Problems" 111
  • 6 - The Unfinished Revolution, 1970-2000 136
  • Epilogue - People First 155
  • Notes 159
  • Bibliography 191
  • Index 199
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