Fern Leaves from Fanny's Port-Folio

By Fanny Fern | Go to book overview

FIFTEENTH THOUSAND.

FERNE LEAVES FROM
FANNY’S PORT-FOLIO.

SECOND SERIES.

With Original Designs by Fred M. Coffin

AUBURN AND BUFFALO:
MILLER, ORTON & MULLIGAN.
LONDON:
SAMPSON LOW, SON & CO.,
1854.

-iii-

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Fern Leaves from Fanny's Port-Folio
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vi
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations xii
  • Fern Leaves—second Series 13
  • Aunt Hepsy 36
  • Thoughts at Church 40
  • The Brothers 42
  • Curious-Things 48
  • The Advantages of a House in a Fashionable Square 49
  • Winter Is Coming 59
  • "The Other Sex." 61
  • Soliloquy of Mr. Broadbrim 63
  • Willy Grey 65
  • Tabitha Tompkins’ Soliloquy 82
  • Soliloquy of a Housemaid 85
  • Ceitics 87
  • Forgetful Husbands 89
  • Summer Friends 91
  • How the Wires Are Pulled- Or, What Printer’s Ink Will Do 92
  • Who Would Be the Last Man? 95
  • «only a Cousin." 96
  • The Calm of Death 99
  • Mrs. Adolphus Smith Sporting the "Blue Stocking." 101
  • Cecile Vray 103
  • Sam Smith’s Soliloquy 105
  • Love and Duty 110
  • A False Peoverb 114
  • A Model Husband 116
  • How Is It? 118
  • A Morning Ramble 120
  • Hour-Glass Thoughts 123
  • Boarding House Experience 125
  • A Grumble from the (H)Altar 132
  • A Wick-Ed Paragraph 133
  • Mistaken Philanthropy 135
  • Insignifcant Love 137
  • A Model Married Man 139
  • Meditations of Paul Pry, Jun 141
  • Sunshine and Young Mothers 144
  • Uncle Ben’s Attack of Spring Fever, and How He Got Cured 146
  • The Aged Minister Voted a Dismission 150
  • The Fatal Marriage 152
  • Frances Sargeant Osgood 157
  • A Mother’s Prayer in Illistess 159
  • Best Things 161
  • The Vestry Meeting 164
  • A Broadway Shop Reverie 167
  • "The Old Woman." 170
  • Sunday Morning at the Dibdins 172
  • Items of Travel 175
  • Newspaper-Dom 178
  • Have We Any Men among Us? 181
  • How to Cube the Blues 183
  • Rain in the City 185
  • Mrs. Weasel’s Husband 187
  • Countey Sunday vs. City Sunday 189
  • Sober Husbands 192
  • Our Street 194
  • When You Are Angry 199
  • Little Bessie 201
  • The Delights of Visiting 205
  • Helen Haven’s "Happy New Year." 207
  • Dollars and Dimes 212
  • Our Nelly 214
  • "Study Men, Not Books." 218
  • "Murder 0F the Innocents;" 220
  • American Ladies 224
  • The Stray Sheep 226
  • The Fashionable Preacher 230
  • "Cash." 233
  • Only a Child 235
  • Mr. Pipkin’s Ideas of Family Retrenchment 237
  • A Chapter for Nice Old Farmers 239
  • Madame Rouillon’s "Mourning Saloon." 241
  • Fashion in Funerals 243
  • Household Tyrants 245
  • Women and Money 247
  • The Sick Bachelor 249
  • A Mother’s Influence 252
  • Mr. Punch Mistaken 257
  • Feen Musings 259
  • The Time to Choose 261
  • Spring Is Coming 262
  • Steamboat Sights and Reflections 265
  • A Gotham Reverie 268
  • Sickness Comes to You in the City 269
  • Hungry Husbands 273
  • Light and Shadow 275
  • A Matrimonial Reverie 278
  • What Love Will Accomplish 279
  • Mrs. Grumble’s Soliloquy 283
  • Henry Ward Beecher 285
  • An Old Maid’s Decision 289
  • A Punch at «punch." 291
  • Father Taylor, the Sailor’s Preacher 292
  • Signs of the Times 296
  • Whom Does It Concern? 300
  • "Who Loves a Rainy Day?" 306
  • A Conscientious Young Man 310
  • City Scenes and City Life 312
  • Two Pictures 330
  • Feminine Waiters at Hotels 332
  • Letter to the Empress Eugenia 334
  • Music in the Natural Way 337
  • For Ladies That "Go Shopping." 339
  • Modern Improvements 344
  • The Old Merchant Wants a Situation 348
  • A Moving Tale 350
  • This Side and That 358
  • Mrs. Zebedee Smith’s Philosophy 361
  • Opening of the Crystal Palace 363
  • A Lance Couched Foe the Childeen 369
  • A Chapter on Housekeeping 371
  • Barnum’s Museum 373
  • A Fern Reverie 377
  • Apollo Hyacinth 381
  • Spoiled Little Boy 384
  • A "Brown Study" —suggested by Brown Vails 386
  • Incident at the Five Points House of Industry 388
  • Nancy Pry’s Soliloquy 396
  • For Little Children 397
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