CHAPTER VII

ALL summer long the family toiled, and in the fall they had money enough for Jurgis and Ona to be married according to home traditions of decency. In the latter part of November they hired a hall, and invited all their new acquaintances, who came and left them over a hundred dollars in debt.

It was a bitter and cruel experience, and it plunged them into an agony of despair. Such a time, of all times, for them to have it, when their hearts were made tender! Such a pitiful beginning it was for their married life; they loved each other so, and they could not have the briefest respite! It was a time when everything cried out to them that they ought to be happy; when wonder burned in their hearts, and leaped into flame at the slightest breath. They were shaken to the depths of them, with the awe of love realized -- and was it so very weak of them that they cried out for a little peace? They had opened their hearts, like flowers to the springtime, and the merciless winter had fallen upon them. They wondered if ever any love that had blossomed in the world had been so crushed and trampled!

Over them, relentless and savage, there cracked the lash of want; the morning after the wedding it sought them as they slept, and drove them out before daybreak to work. Ona was scarcely able to stand with exhaustion; but if she were to lose her place they would be ruined, and she would surely lose it if she were not on time that day. They all had to go, even little Stanislovas, who was ill from overindulgence in sausages and sarsaparilla. All that day he stood at his lard-machine, rocking unsteadily, his eyes closing in spite of him; and he all but lost his

-86-

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The Jungle
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 23
  • Chapter III 35
  • Chapter IV 49
  • Chapter V 63
  • Chapter VI 75
  • Chapter VII 86
  • Chapter VIII 99
  • Chapter IX 108
  • Chapter X 118
  • Chapter XI 130
  • Chapter XII 141
  • Chapter XIII 150
  • Chapter XIV 160
  • Chapter XV 168
  • Chapter XVI 183
  • Chapter XVII 193
  • Chapter XVIII 205
  • Chapter XIX 218
  • Chapter XX 229
  • Chapter XXI 241
  • Chapter XXII 252
  • Chapter XXIII 265
  • Chapter XXIV 277
  • Chapter XXV 292
  • Chapter XXVI 315
  • Chapter XXVII 335
  • Chapter XXVIII 351
  • Chapter XXIX 368
  • Chapter XXX 379
  • Chapter XXXI 394
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