The Kingdom and the Republic: Sovereign Hawai'i and the Early United States

By Noelani Arista | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

‘A‘ole pau ka ‘ike i ka hālau ho‘okahi

All knowlege is not found in one school

E nā akua, nā ‘aumakua, nā lālani o nā ali‘i,
e o‘u mau kūpuna, a i nā kumu o ka wā ma mua a i kēia
wā e holo nei.

My journey to bring this book to completion began decades ago with the intellectual spark and guidance of many kumu (teachers). In seeking after knowledge, I have been guided by these authoritative words that were passed down to us: ‘a‘ole pau ka ‘ike i ka hālau ho‘okahi. My intellectual mo‘okū‘auhau has grown mana (branches) into scholarly training in Hawaiian religion, language, and literature, and American history.

My first appreciation is for those kumu who trained me in Hawaiian oral traditions through performance. I am deeply indebted to Robert Manuhaokalani Gay, Pōmaika‘i Gaui, and John Keolamaka‘āinanaokalaniokamehameha‘ekolu Lake for teaching me the importance of the beauty and strength of language, kumu who trained my memory and ear and helped me to find my voice. It is due to the perseverence of such kumu in keeping oral historical traditions of Hawaiian prayer, chant, and dance alive and vibrant that those of us belonging to succeeding generations have been able to travel the path of our ancestors. The training I received in mele and oli was fortified by the profound knowledge of kūpuna (elders) and experts from our community. Working with Edith McKinzie on the Hawaiianlanguage newspaper indexing project and Rubellite Kawena Johnson on the kanikau (laments) project opened up vistas on Hawaiian-language print culture and intellectual traditions that remain fathomless, ever offering scholars opportunities for future study. They taught me how to translate, how to present my findings before the community, how to speak like a woman, a native scholar, and how to tell mo‘olelo.

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