Duel in the Sun: Tom Watson and Jack Nicklaus in the Battle of Turnberry

By Michael Corcoran | Go to book overview

TWO

BECAUSE PROFESSIONAL GOLFERS SPEND SO MUCH TIME in the sun, most of them wear a hat to protect their skin and reduce glare as they look things over preparing to play a shot. This is a sensible thing, and over the years hats have become so integral a part of the uniform of professional golfers that the headwear goes largely unnoticed, but Jack Nicklaus never had a head for hats. During the prime years of his career he often eschewed wearing one except in the most ungodly heat. The things sat so awkwardly on his head that he looked silly in them, and no one ever looked more ludicrous in a hat than Jack Nicklaus did posing for photographs prior to the 1962 Open Championship at Old Troon. In Scotland as the reigning U.S. Open champion and playing in his first Open Championship, Nicklaus modeled for advertising photos for the Slazenger golf equipment company. The results bring to mind the hokey publicity shots of American football players from the same era. The images of Nicklaus show a young man with a boyish face and a body that can best be described as thick. His trousers are too tight, as is his cardigan sweater, and the long-sleeve polo shirt under the sweater is fastened closely around his bull neck. It is the hat he is wearing, however, that stands out. It’s a cap of the style favored by British men of the time (and to some degree to this day) because it keeps the head warm and does not blow off in the gusts of strong wind so often felt in the British Isles; but the hat worn by Nicklaus would not have blown off in a hurricane and fit his head so snugly that it appears a crowbar would be needed to remove it. He could not wear the hat at a jaunty angle, because to do so would have required a bit of room for maneuvering. There was no such room.

As ridiculous as Nicklaus looked, the Scots neither noticed nor cared, and neither did the British press; what they saw was a frighteningly superb player of the game. They had been aware of his awesome potential for a few years by the time he arrived at Troon. Nicklaus played on the 1959 U.S. Walker Cup team that decimated the home squad at Muirfield, and a year

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Duel in the Sun: Tom Watson and Jack Nicklaus in the Battle of Turnberry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Prologue 1
  • One 3
  • Two 25
  • Three 49
  • Four 66
  • Five 83
  • Six 109
  • Seven 130
  • Eight 149
  • Nine 158
  • Ten 175
  • Afterword 201
  • Acknowledgments 214
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 216

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.