A History of Multiple Sclerosis

By Colin L. Talley | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book would not have been possible without the unflagging support and encouragement of my mentors and friends, Howard I. Kushner and Guenter B. Risse. I thank Carol Kushner, Michael Rogan, John Parascandola, Elizabeth Demers, Claire E. Sterk, Guenter B. Risse, Howard I. Kushner, and many anonymous reviewers over the years for reading and commenting on versions of this manuscript. I would also like to thank Bert Hansen for suggesting Praeger Press to me and many helpful conversations about the project, Katharine E. S. Donahue at the Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library at the University of California, Los Angeles, for her help with the Putnam collection, and Ann M. Palmer for her assistance at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society Library in New York. Earlier versions of Chapters Two, Four, and Five appeared respectively in Colin L. Talley, “The Emergence of Multiple Sclerosis, 1870–1950: A Puzzle of Historical Epidemiology,” Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48(3) (Summer 2005): 383–395; Colin L. Talley, “The Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis in Los Angeles and the United States, 1947–1960,” Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 77(4) (Winter 2003): 874–899; and in Colin Talley, “The Combined Efforts of Community and Science: American Culture, Patient Activism, and the Multiple Sclerosis Movement in the United States, 1946–1960,” in Emerging Illnesses and Society, Negotiating the Public Health Agenda, edited by Randall Packard and Peter Brown (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004), pp. 39–70. I thank Johns Hopkins University Press for permission to reprint material from these articles. I also thank Taylor & Francis for permission to reprint material from Colin L. Talley, “The

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