Roman Catholicism in the United States: A Thematic History

By Margaret M. McGuinness; James T. Fisher | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

PATRICK ALLITT is the Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University. He is the author of seven books, including Catholic Converts: British and American Intellectuals Turn to Rome and Catholic Intellectuals and Conservative Politics in America.

JEFFREY M. BURNS is Director of the Francis G. Harpst Center for Catholic Thought and Culture at the University of San Diego and Director of the Academy of American Franciscan History. He is the author of Disturbing the Peace: A History of the Christian Family Movement, 1949–1974 and, with Joseph White and Ellen Skerrett, Keeping Faith: European and Asian Catholic Immigrants.

UNA M. CADEGAN is Professor of History at the University of Dayton. She is the author of All Good Books Are Catholic Books: Print Culture, Censorship, and Modernity in Twentieth-Century America and co-editor with James L. Heft, S.M., of “In the Lógos of Love”: Promise and Predicament in Catholic Intellectual Life.

ROBERT E. CARBONNEAU, C.P., is a priest and historian for the Passionist Congregation (eastern U.S.) and Affiliated Research Fellow at the Ricci Institute for Chinese-Western Culture, University of San Francisco. Research, study, and publications have concentrated on the Passionist history in twentieth-century Hunan, China, the United States, and throughout the world. From 2014 to 2017 he served as Executive Director of the U.S. Catholic China Bureau, Berkeley, California.

KAREN MARY DAVALOS is a Professor in the Chicano and Latino Studies Department at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, where she launched the major initiative “Mexican American Art since 1848.” Her research and teaching interests include Chicana feminist thought and praxis, spirituality, visual and cultural studies, and the archive.

ROY DOMENICO is a Professor of History at the University of Scranton. He has published on Italian Catholic politics in the postwar era as well as on U.S.-Vatican rela

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