Youth Futures: Comparative Research and Transformative Visions

By Jennifer Gidley; Sohail Inayatullah | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
From Youth Futures
to Futures for All:
Reclaiming the Human Story

Marcus Bussey

I recently watched the 1960 Academy—Award winning movie The Time Machine with my boys (aged ten and thirteen). We enjoyed ourselves, and they felt quite inspired by how the time traveler helped the young Eloi take on the evil Morlock. This got me thinking about how the relationships between adults and youth are framed in our culture. What lessons had my boys learned by watching this movie? Well, I looked at what H. G. Wells had written in his original story and found that what had changed between the two versions—a lapse of sixty-five years—was a real escalation in the level of agency exhibited by the time traveler in the movie. The original book was more philosophical and speculative and owed a real debt to Darwinism. The movie version was more romantic and offered a thoroughly modernist manifesto for change.

The Time Machine, in its movie form, is a parable rich in the ambiguities and tensions that define and sustain the modernist enterprise. Essentially, Wells is describing, and the movie amplifies this considerably, the tensions between Utopian and dystopian systems of governance. Utopia leads to weakness and decay, dystopia to brutalization and degeneration. The movie version brings in romance and revolution, which give hope—thank you, Hollywood!—while Wells’s text leaves the Eloi and Morlock to their manifest Darwinian destiny of further decline. In both the book and the film, the young are at the mercy of an adult world gone wrong, but it takes Hollywood to actually turn the time traveler into an archetypal hero with the qualities necessary to galvanize action and energy into the young Eloi. Revolution follows and leads to the overthrow of generations of servitude to the machines and the Morlock. From this struggle between Utopia and dystopia, a new world order will emerge: a Utopia or good society.

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Youth Futures: Comparative Research and Transformative Visions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.