Youth Futures: Comparative Research and Transformative Visions

By Jennifer Gidley; Sohail Inayatullah | Go to book overview

Youth Essay 1
Optimistic Visions from Australia

Raina Hunter

When I try to imagine how I would like the future to be, I tend to romanticize, to
idealize. I concoct a perfect world in my mind. A world filled with love, with
peace, with happiness. A world free from prejudice and discrimination, from
hate and destruction, from sickness and starvation, from poverty and crime. A
world that would epitomize all my hopes and dreams yet contain none of my
fears.

I am lucky that I can view the world so optimistically. Born in Australia and brought up by hard-working parents, I’ve always been healthy and have never wanted for anything in my life. Millions of others around the world aren’t so lucky. Some are born into famine or poverty, some into civil war, some with debilitating or incurable diseases. Some of these people live lives filled with hunger and suffering, never even getting a chance to break away from the hand of fate that has been given to them. Still others are subjected to lifelong discrimination and prejudice if they are born into a lower class in a class-ridden society such as the “untouchables,” or lowest class, in India. Even if these people are able to provide for themselves and their families to an extent, they are condemned to their social position for life, as are their children and grandchildren. All because of where they were born!

I hope that in the near future, all of the above will become irrelevant. In my preferred future, all people worldwide will be born with equal opportunities in life and the chance to make of it what they will. Although these social justice issues are of utmost concern to me, I also have hopes and dreams for the future on other issues, such as the environment, war, relationships, politics, and work.

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