Youth Futures: Comparative Research and Transformative Visions

By Jennifer Gidley; Sohail Inayatullah | Go to book overview

Youth Essay 2
Voice of the Future from Pakistan

Bilal Aslam

Today’s youth: tomorrow’s world.

A statement which none can deny. So how is our future faring in today’s world? What does it want? What does it feel? Once in a while everyone gives a thought or two to these questions. Some continue to ponder, others give a content smile imagining well-dressed, neat and tidy youngsters sitting in a lecture theater in one of the leading universities of the world, and of course there’s the third kind, which outrightly dismisses any such thoughts saying: “Nah, they’re just kids, what more could it be to them than jazzy sports bikes, loud music, and their girl/boy friends.”

Then what does our future truly look like? To answer this question I would like to paint a picture before you and let you be the judge. Our picture has three faces. Each face represents a different individual from a different part of the world. Let me give you a brief background of our three characters.

Chris is the only son of a wealthy businessman living in a beautiful mansion in Beverly Hills, California, in the United States.

Nam is one of the eight children of a factory worker from Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Nam’s father died a little while before Nam was born.

Liu is the only daughter of a middle-class government employee living in Tokyo, Japan.

At present all three of them are in their late teens.

On a cold November morning, Chris woke up at 8:00, slowly rolled back his doona, and wandered into his ensuite bathroom for a hot shower. After flicking through his many choices of expensive brand-name clothes for what to wear today, he went downstairs for some bacon, eggs, and coffee. After breakfast he picked up the keys to his new Porsche, which his dad

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