Youth Futures: Comparative Research and Transformative Visions

By Jennifer Gidley; Sohail Inayatullah | Go to book overview

Chapter 17
I Don’t Care about the Future
(If I Can’t Influence It)

Sabina Head


DISCOVERING FUTURES STUDIES

I went to a futures workshop as part of a teaching inservice in the area of studies of society and the environment (SOSE) in 1996 and decided to attempt some futures work for a final unit in a graduate diploma in media. It seemed that futures addressed the need for the human race to develop some collective and long-term planning skills for itself and the well-being of the planet as a whole, since we had become powerful enough to alter our surroundings drastically. Our awareness of the possible effects of these changes we imposed seemed to be limited, however, along witb our similarly limited capacity for self-awareness. Education appeared to be a worthwhile field for the development of a personal commitment to a futures perspective, and it has proved to be very rewarding. Students seem to be receptive to futures ideas and can develop confident, positive attitudes toward the future in an encouraging environment. Their contribution in futures work has been beneficial and at times inspiring. I have done futures work with lower secondary SOSE students, as well as Drama students in the lower and upper secondary areas, with some encouraging results.

Support for futures studies in the field of education in Queensland has been in the form of a futures perspective written into all syllabuses in the eight key learning areas, from preschool to year ten, legitimizing and encouraging development in the area. Much of SOSE work is already futures-oriented in terms of examining current issues in a geographical context and learning from past as well as current issues in a historical context. A more explicit focus on the future and ways of dealing with it was added to the course after the initial survey.

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