Youth Futures: Comparative Research and Transformative Visions

By Jennifer Gidley; Sohail Inayatullah | Go to book overview

Youth Essay 3
Shared Futures from the Philippines

Michael Guanco

Why should I think of the future when I am here at the present, still struggling to live decently and perhaps struggling to live up to my own personal expectations of myself? Don’t you find it quite absurd that we’re actually being led to an illusion of a future? Can we not do something about our present situation so that it will set a tone for a brighter tomorrow? Who the hell will care for the future when my stomach is empty or all of my trusted friends have turned their backs on me? These are the things that I often encounter when I ponder what kind of future I would like to see. This is most especially true when I am really depressed and I feel that there are so many burdens on myself. Thus, I have a hard time convincing myself that, indeed, I have a stake in the future. Difficulty in believing that, indeed, I can create or move toward whatever future I prefer.

I remember the time when one of my professors told me casually, when I started confiding about my subtle problems, “Mike, you have to dream, it’s free, and nobody will take it away from you.” Then it dawned on me that this dreaming is not an illusion but the kind wherein we are allowed to dream a future into reality. When I started envisioning my goals, my life became “light,” as if a positive energy has emerged from within. And whenever these workable dreams fail, there are still options. The beauty of dreaming is that ideas are simple but as vast as the space, and the choices are ours.

To be with my preferred future, I must also know what is going on at present. Otherwise, my visions are blind. Man fails whenever he or she fails to recognize the sea of humanity that we are all floating in. Humans are not capable of living without the other, but they often assume that they can. Our preferred futures are not possible if people will not diminish their selfishness. We need to share and cooperate with each other.

-237-

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