Encyclopedia of African American Artists

By dele jegede | Go to book overview

G

Sam Gilliam (b. 1933), Painter.

Gilliam’s reputation is built on his ability to push existing boundaries, challenge entrenched modes of creating art, and intuit a new format for narrating new paradigms. The seventh of eight children, Gilliam was born in Tupelo, Mississippi, on November 30, 1933. He was an infant when his father, Sam Gilliam, a railroad worker, and Estery, his mother who was a homemaker, relocated to Louisville, Kentucky. Gilliam’s interest in art began early, and he received support and encouragement from his teachers in elementary school and at Central High School in Louisville, from which he graduated in 1951. That same year, he entered the University of Louisville, from where he graduated in 1955 with a B.A. in fine arts. In 1956, he joined the U.S. Army and served for two years. He began his graduate work at the University of Louisville in 1958 on part time and maintained a full-time daytime teaching job. He completed his M.A. in painting in 1961, which was also the time that his fiancée, Dorothy Butler (who had attended Ursuline College in Ohio and Tuskegee Institute in Alabama) had just completed her graduate studies at Columbia University, and secured a job at the Washington Post. In 1962, they married, and Gilliam, who had spent four years in Louisville as a teacher, moved to Washington.

In his formative, post-Louisville years in Washington, Gilliam took his time to associate with artists in the city and become invested in what the dominant trends were at that time. He established a studio, had an exhibition in Adams Morgan, and met with a number of notable artists who were established in Washington, including Robert Gates and Tom Downing, a member of the Washington Color School. Eventually, Gilliam became acquainted with Kenneth Noland and Howard Morris, two of the key exponents of the Washington Color School. This association, and the insights that Gilliam gained from his observations and active engagement at exhibitions, resulted in a conceptual shift and radical retooling. Gilliam abandoned figurative painting but also was careful to develop his own style, a challenging task given the caliber of artists in the field with established reputations. He began to question the rationale behind the process of making art in certain ways. This was the environment that radically altered the whole notion of painting as a contained entity in a fixed space.

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of African American Artists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • A 1
  • B 17
  • C 35
  • D 55
  • E 77
  • F 95
  • G 99
  • H 105
  • J 117
  • K 125
  • L 133
  • M 151
  • N 169
  • O 173
  • P 181
  • R 201
  • S 211
  • T 231
  • U 239
  • V 243
  • W 247
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index 283
  • About the Author 295
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.