The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Vol. 3-4

By Edgar Allan Poe | Go to book overview

ISRAFEL*

IN Heaven a spirit doth dwell
               “Whose heart-strings are a lute;”
          None sing so wildly well
As the angel Israfel,
And the giddy stars (so legends tell)
Ceasing their hymns, attend the spell
    Of his voice, all mute.

Tottering above
    In her highest noon,
    The enamoured moon
Blushes with love,
    While, to listen, the red levin
    (With the rapid Pleiads, even,
    Which were seven,)
    Pauses in Heaven.

And they say (the starry choir
    And the other listening things)
That Israfeli’s fire
Is owing to that lyre
    By which he sits and sings—
The trembling living wire
Of those unusual strings.

* And the angel Israfel, whose heart-strings are a lute, and who has the sweetest voice of all God’s creatures.—KORAN.

-391-

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Vol. 3-4
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents of Vol. III v
  • Berenice 1
  • Eleonora 12
  • Ligeia 20
  • Morella 41
  • Metzengerstein 48
  • Shadow—A Parable 60
  • Silence—A Fable 64
  • Philosophy of Furniture 69
  • A Tale of Jerusalem 77
  • A Tale of the Ragged Mountains 83
  • The Spectacles 97
  • The Duc de L’Omelette 130
  • The Oblong Box 135
  • King Pest 151
  • Three Sundays in a Week 167
  • The Devil in the Belfry 176
  • Lionizing 185
  • The Man of the Crowd 192
  • Never Bet the Devil Your Head 204
  • "Thou Art the Man" 217
  • The Sphinx 237
  • Some Words with a Mummy 244
  • Hop-Frog 266
  • Four Beasts in One the Homo-Cameleopard 279
  • Why the Little Frenchman Wears His Hand in a Sling 289
  • Bon-Bon 297
  • Contents of Vol. IV 319
  • Author’s Preface to the Poems, 1849 Edition 321
  • The Poetic Principle 323
  • Miscellaneous Poems the Raven 350
  • Lenore 356
  • Hymn 357
  • A Valentine 358
  • The Coliseum 359
  • To Helen 361
  • To—— 363
  • Ulalume 364
  • The Bells 367
  • An Enigma 371
  • Annabel Lee 372
  • To My Mother 373
  • The Haunted Palace 374
  • The Conqueror Worm 376
  • To F—s S. O—D 377
  • To One in Paradise 378
  • The Valley of Rest 379
  • The City in the Sea 380
  • The Sleeper 382
  • Silence 384
  • A Dream within a Dream 385
  • Dream-Land 386
  • To Zante 388
  • Eulalie 389
  • Eldorado 390
  • Israfel 391
  • For Annie 393
  • To 396
  • Bridal Ballad 397
  • Scenes from "Politian" 398
  • Poems Written in Youth 417
  • Al Aaraaf 418
  • Tamerlane 432
  • To —— 440
  • A Dream 441
  • Romance 442
  • Fairy-Land 443
  • The Lake—To—— 444
  • Song 445
  • To M. L. S—— 446
  • Dreams 447
  • Spirits of the Dead 448
  • Evening Star 449
  • "In Youth Have I Known One with Whom the Earth" 450
  • "The Happiest Day, the Happiest Hour" 451
  • Alone 452
  • Eureka 453
  • The Rationale of Verse 582
  • The Power of Words 638
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