CHAPTER XII

THE next day when Nilovna came up to the gates of the factory with her load, the guides stopped her roughly, and ordering her to put the pails down on the ground, made a careful examination. “ My eatables will get cold,” she observed calmly, as they felt around her dress.

“Shut up ! ” said a guard sullenly. Another one, tapping her lightly on the shoulder, said with assurance:

“Those books are thrown across the fence, I say ! ” Old man Sizov came up to her and looking around said in an undertone :

“Did you hear, mother ? ” “What?”

“About the pamphlets. They’ve appeared again. They’ve just scattered them all over like salt over bread. Much good those arrests and searches have done ! My nephew Mazin has been hauled away to prison, your son’s been taken. Now it’s plain it isn’t he ! ” And stroking his beard Sizov concluded, “ It’s not people, but thoughts, and thoughts are not fleas; you can’t catch them ! ”

He gathered his beard in his hand, looked at her, and said as he walked away:

“Why don’t you come to see me some time ? I guess you are lonely all by yourself.”

-125-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • List of Illustrations xvii
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 11
  • Chapter III 24
  • Chapter IV 41
  • Chapter V 50
  • Chapter VI 62
  • Chapter VII 71
  • Chapter VIII 80
  • Chapter IX 93
  • Chapter X 102
  • Chapter XI 114
  • Chapter XII 125
  • Chapter XIII 131
  • Chapter XIV 155
  • Chapter XV 166
  • Chapter XVI 179
  • Chapter XVII 192
  • Chapter XVIII 205
  • Chapter XIX 217
  • Chapter XX 225
  • Part II 237
  • Chapter I 239
  • Chapter II 252
  • Chapter III 271
  • Chapter IV 287
  • Chapter V 300
  • Chapter VI 309
  • Chapter VII 323
  • Chapter VIII 332
  • Chapter IX 341
  • Chapter X 355
  • Chapter XI 371
  • Chapter XII 392
  • Chapter XIII 404
  • Chapter XIV 421
  • Chapter XV 435
  • Chapter XVI 456
  • Chapter XVII 469
  • Chapter XVIII 477
  • Chapter XIX 489
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