CHAPTER XX

COMRADES !” the voice of Pavel was heard. “ Soldiers are people the same as ourselves. They will not strike us ! Why should they beat us ? Because we bear the truth necessary for all? This our truth is necessary to them, too. Just now they do not understand this ; but the time is nearing when they will rise with us, when they will march, not under the banner of robbers and murderers, the banner which the liars and beasts order them to call the banner of glory and honor, but under our banner of freedom and goodness! We ought to go forward so that they should understand our truth the sooner. Forward, comrades ! Ever forward ! ”

Pavel’s voice sounded firm, the words rang in the air distinctly. But the crowd fell asunder; one after the other the people dropped off to the right or to the left, going toward their homes, or leaning against the fences. Now the crowd had the shape of a wedge, and its point was Pavel, over whose head the banner of the laboring people was burning red.

At the end of the street, closing the exit to the square, the mother saw a low, gray wall of men, one just like the other, without faces. On the shoulder of each a bayonet was smiling its thin, chill smile; and from this entire immobile wall a cold gust blew down on the workmen, striking the breast of the mother and penetrating her heart.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mother
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • List of Illustrations xvii
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 11
  • Chapter III 24
  • Chapter IV 41
  • Chapter V 50
  • Chapter VI 62
  • Chapter VII 71
  • Chapter VIII 80
  • Chapter IX 93
  • Chapter X 102
  • Chapter XI 114
  • Chapter XII 125
  • Chapter XIII 131
  • Chapter XIV 155
  • Chapter XV 166
  • Chapter XVI 179
  • Chapter XVII 192
  • Chapter XVIII 205
  • Chapter XIX 217
  • Chapter XX 225
  • Part II 237
  • Chapter I 239
  • Chapter II 252
  • Chapter III 271
  • Chapter IV 287
  • Chapter V 300
  • Chapter VI 309
  • Chapter VII 323
  • Chapter VIII 332
  • Chapter IX 341
  • Chapter X 355
  • Chapter XI 371
  • Chapter XII 392
  • Chapter XIII 404
  • Chapter XIV 421
  • Chapter XV 435
  • Chapter XVI 456
  • Chapter XVII 469
  • Chapter XVIII 477
  • Chapter XIX 489
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 504

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.