Green Gold: The Forest Industry in British Columbia

By Patricia Marchak | Go to book overview

4
The Structure of the Industry

The provincial Crown owns most of the resource. However, as the previous chapters have shown, ownership signifies control only if the owners retain rights that provide them with genuine control. The Crown could do that only if it had a very effective forestry service to which governments were obliged to listen and which was financed on a long-term and non-manipulative basis; if the terms of leases included tight reins on cutting allotments and replanting requirements; and if the governments of any day were both willing and able to say “no” to their largest corporate taxpayers. It is, at the least, doubtful if any of these conditions exist in British Columbia.

By the end of 1981, only two pulp and paper companies in B.C. were owned by residents of B.C. One is formally owned still by the B.C. government via 5 per cent majority shares; however the ultimate ownership status of B.C. Resources Investment Corporation (previously known as CanCel, and later as B.C. Timber) is unclear, as the dispersion of shares may well include more shares held outside B.C. than within it. Canadian Forest Products is the other company, privately owned by the Prentice and Bentley families.

All other pulp companies are owned elsewhere. MacMillan Bloedel and Northwood are owned by Brascan-Noranda of Toronto. Weyerhaeuser, Scott, Weldwood, and West Fraser have American parents. Crown Zellerbach sold its B.C. holdings to a New Zealand firm in 1982. Tahsis is co-owned by Canadian Pacific Investments of Toronto and the East Asiatic Company of Denmark. B.C. Forest Products is co-owned by the Alberta Government’s Energy corporation, Mead and Scott of the United States. Eurocan is coowned by Enzo-Gutzeit of Finland and West Fraser of the United States. Quesnel River Pulp is co-owned by West Fraser and Daishowa-Marubeni of Japan. Cariboo Pulp and Paper is co-owned by Weldwood and DaishowaMarubeni. Crestbrook Forest Industries is co-owned by Mitsubishi and Honshu Paper of Japan.

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Green Gold: The Forest Industry in British Columbia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Part One- Capital xxi
  • 1- A Staples Economy 1
  • 2- History of a Resource Industry 29
  • 3- "Partners with Industry" 55
  • 4- The Structure of the Industry 82
  • Part Two- Labour 113
  • 5- Class and Human Capital 115
  • 6- Markets, Technology, and Employment 156
  • 7- Patterns of Employment and Unemployment 181
  • 8- Employment Conditions for Women in Resource Towns 213
  • 9- Job Control, Security, and Satisfaction 249
  • 10- Job Control and Ideology 269
  • Part Three- Communities 301
  • 11- The Instant Town 303
  • 12- At the End of the Forest 323
  • 13- Policies for Change 348
  • Appendix A- Methodology and Samples 381
  • Appendix B- Tables Accompanying Chapter 9- Job Control, Security, and Satisfaction 389
  • Appendix C- Tables Accompanying Chapter 10- Ideology 399
  • Bibliography 416
  • Index 437
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