Resurrection - Vol. 1

By Leo Tolstoy; Archibald J. Wolfe | Go to book overview

I.

Strive as they might—several hundred thousand people huddled together on one tiny patch of ground— to distort the face of the earth upon which they dwelt ; strive as they might to plug up the earth with boulders so that nothing should grow upon it ; strive as they might to weed out every sprouting blade of grass ; to pollute the air with the smoke of coal and naphtha ; to hack the trees and to keep off beast and fowl—spring was spring, even in the city. The sun gave forth warmth, the reviving herbage grew and greened wherever it had not been obliterated, not only on the boulevard lawns, but even in the cracks of the pavement, while the birch, the poplar and the cherry trees sprouted their gummy and fragrant leaves, and the lindens stretched their swelling buds ; the crows, the sparrows and the doves merrily builded their nests, as befitted the season of spring, and the flies, comforted by the warmth of the sun, buzzed along the house walls. Gay were the plants, and the birds, and the insects, and the children. But the people—the big, the adults—ceased not to deceive and to afflict, alike their neighbors and themselves. The people saw nothing sacred or significant in this morning of springtime, nor in the beauty of God’s world bestowed as a blessing upon all creatures,—that beauty which inclines the heart to peace, harmony and love, but sacred and significant appeared to them their own

-5-

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Resurrection - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface *
  • Key to Russian Names in "Resurrection." i
  • Glossary of Russian Names in "Resurrection." v
  • Part the First 1
  • I 5
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