Muslim Pilgrimage in the Modern World

By Babak Rahimi; Peyman Eshaghi | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments and Note on Transliteration

This book owes much to the generosity of colleagues and friends who have provided insightful comments on the topic of pilgrimage from both historical and theoretical perspectives. The contributors to this volume were invited to submit a study on an aspect of Muslim pilgrimage in particular historical and social contexts, based on their expertise. In attempting to rise to this challenge, the chapters presented here explore themes on pilgrimage with a focus on specific localities, shrines, mosques, or Mecca, where Muslim identities through ritual traditions continue to be reinvented in complex and porous ways. We would like to thank all the contributors, the anonymous reviewers, and especially Elaine Maisner and series editors Carl W. Ernst and Bruce B. Lawrence at the University of North Carolina Press for making this work possible, to the benefit of current and future researchers. We would like to thank Mehrnaz Eizadyrad for help with copyediting. Finally, special thanks are owed to Nile Green and Karen Ruffle, who read the manuscript and offered helpful comments.

The present volume adopts a system of transliteration for Arabic, Persian, and Turkish based loosely on that used in the International Journal of Middle East Studies (IJMES), with some modifications and eliminating all diacritical marks except when transliterated passages from the original text are included, and American Library Association–Library of Congress (especially for chapters 2, 5, and 12, which include Chinese and Urdu). With the aim of appealing to nonspecialists, the recurring words “Hajj,” “ʿUmra,” and “Muharram” appear as capitalized English words. “Imam” is also used as it appears in English dictionaries. While we adopt the Arabic word “ziyara” for the volume, we do not privilege such transliteration over other linguistic expressions in their vernacular forms. As the following chapters demonstrate, variation in the use of the term “ziyara” carries plural understandings of pilgrimage. Finally, all years in the text relate to the Common Era unless otherwise stated.

-ix-

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