The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu: Being a Somewhat Detailed Account of the Amazing Adventures of Nayland Smith in His Trailing of the Sinister Chinaman

By Sax Rohmer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIX

DUSK was falling when we made our way in the direction of Maple Cottage. Nayland Smith appeared to be keenly interested in the character of the district. A high and ancient wall bordered the road along which we walked for a considerable distance. Later it gave place to a rickety fence.

My friend peered through a gap in the latter.

“ There is quite an extensive estate here,” he said, “ not yet cut up by the builder. It is well wooded on one side, and there appears to be a pool lower down.”

The road was a quiet one, and we plainly heard the tread — quite unmistakable — of an approaching policeman. Smith continued to peer through the hole in the fence, until the officer drew up level with us. Then :

“ Does this piece of ground extend down to the village, constable? ” he inquired.

Quite willing for a chat, the man stopped, and stood with his thumbs thrust in his belt.

“Yes, sir. They tell me three new roads will

-362-

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The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu: Being a Somewhat Detailed Account of the Amazing Adventures of Nayland Smith in His Trailing of the Sinister Chinaman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu 1
  • Chapter II 13
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 37
  • Chapter V 53
  • Chapter VI 63
  • Chapter VII 80
  • Chapter VIII 94
  • Chapter IX 106
  • Chapter X 120
  • Chapter XI 130
  • Chapter XII 147
  • Chapter XIII 160
  • Chapter XIV 174
  • Chapter XV 187
  • Chapter XVI 201
  • Chapter XVII 216
  • Chapter XVIII 235
  • Chapter XIX 253
  • Chapter XX 264
  • Chapter XXI 272
  • Chapter XXII 289
  • Chapter XXIII 295
  • Chapter XXIV 307
  • Chapter XXV 323
  • Chapter XXVI 332
  • Chapter XXVII 340
  • Chapter XXVIII 350
  • Chapter XXIX 362
  • Chapter XXX 373
  • The Best of Recent Fiction at a Popular Price 386
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