Night Comes to the Cumberlands: A Biography of a Depressed Area

By Harry M. Caudill | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
Our Disinherited Forebears

SYSTEMATIC and orderly migration onto the shores of North America began, as every schoolboy knows, in the early 1600s and persisted thereafter at an ever-rising tempo for more than three hundred years. Europeans came to the New World for many reasons and under a great diversity of circumstances. In New England whole families came from England and settled small but entire villages. A shipload of settlers was likely to contain representatives from a dozen crafts. Thus a community life sprang up which was patterned closely after the social order from which the people had migrated. Some of the settlers came to avoid religious inhibitions, some were adventurers in quest of fame, and others were seeking political freedom and economic opportunity not to be found in Europe. But, for whatever reasons, they came freely and willingly. These essential premises are evidenced by the fact that, within thirty years after the first settlements, a considerable number of chartered towns had sprung up over a wide area in New England. More often than not the newcomer to these Northern shores brought his wife and a steadily augmenting number of children. Most of the settlers were from the middle class, and not a few were landed gentry, perhaps in most instances sons whose inheritance was insufficient to maintain them in the Island Kingdom. Even the similarity of climate contributed to perpetuation of a minuscule England along these rockbound coasts. Thus it turned out that the foundations were laid for a cohesive, well organized and disciplined society. This society, as it grew and strengthened, was able to clear the forests, sow the fields, build the towns

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Night Comes to the Cumberlands: A Biography of a Depressed Area
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 394

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.