The Labour Question: An Epitome of the Evidence and the Report of the Royal Commission on Labour

By T. G. Spyers; Great Britain. Royal Commission on Labour | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III. .
EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY

The Doctrine of Common Employment -- Extent of Employers' Liability -- Proposed Extensions -- Should Employers be made General Insurers against Accidents? -- Insurance Companies -- Contracting Out -- Effect of -- Attitude of Trade Unions towards -- Immunity, not Compensation, demanded -- The Liability of the Employer v. the Liability of the Negligent -- Legal Procedure.

THE Government has, to some extent, anticipated the Report of the Labour Commission by introducing the Employers' Liability Bill, 1893, which embodied some of the more important proposals made by the witnesses. The Bill, however, comprehended neither the whole of the law, nor the whole of the workmen's policy, touching the liability of employers.

According to the common law, the liability of masters with respect to the personal safety of their servants was considered to arise solely from the terms of the contract of service. And, in the absence of express provision to the contrary, every such contract was held to imply an undertaking on the part of the master to exercise due care to associate his servants with competent persons as mates and superiors. But here the master's responsibility was held to cease. Provided that he had exercised due care in the selection

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The Labour Question: An Epitome of the Evidence and the Report of the Royal Commission on Labour
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • Contents v
  • Part I. - Industrial Politics. 1
  • Chapter III - Conciliation and Arbitration 32
  • Part Ii. - Conditions of Labour 48
  • Chapter II - Hours of Labour. 67
  • Chapter III - Employers' Liability 85
  • Chapter IV - The Factory Acts, Etc. 101
  • Chapter V - State and Municipal Employment. 126
  • Chapter VI - The Unemployed 150
  • Part Iii. - Special Subjects. 175
  • Chapter II - Transport Trades. 197
  • Chapter III - Agriculture 212
  • Chapter IV - Labour Departments and Labour Councils. 221
  • Chapter V - Recommendations of the Commission. 227
  • Appendix. 234
  • Index. 241
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