ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

THE AUTHOR wishes to record his indebtedness to the many individuals who through the years have rendered generous assistance to his research on Ryder's life and work; especially to Mrs. Charles de Kay, Philip Evergood, Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. Gurney, Mrs. Rosalie Warner Jones, Kenneth Hayes Miller, Mrs. Lloyd Williams and Mrs. Dorothy Weir Young, all of whom furnished essential personal information and documents; to Mrs. Frederic Fairchild Sherman, who generously donated the material used by Mr. Sherman in writing the first book published on Ryder; to Sheldon Keck of the Brooklyn Museum for invaluable cooperation in scientific examination of paintings; to Murray Pease and F. du Pont Cornelius of the Metropolitan Museum, and Thomas M. Beggs of the National Collection of Fine Arts, for assistance in securing x-rays; to Carmine Dalesio of the Babcock Galleries, for his constant interest and help in all matters connected with Ryder; and to Miss Lelia Wittler, William F. Davidson and Miss Elizabeth Clare of M. Knoedler & Co., Robert G. McIntyre of William Macbeth, Inc., Albert and Harold Milch and Joseph Gotlieb of E. & A. Milch, Inc., and Robert C. Vose of the Vose Galleries, for their valuable information on paintings which have passed through their hands. Special thanks are due also to Rosalind Irvine, Curator of the Whitney Museum of American Art, who prepared the bibliography; to John I. H. Baur, Associate Director of the Museum, for his constant cooperation in examining paintings; and to the author's secretary, Frances Manola, for her unfailing help in research and writing. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the Whitney Museum for its kind permission to use portions of the author's text of the catalogue of the Ryder Centenary Exhibition in 1947.

L.G.

-7-

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Albert P. Ryder
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Acknowledgements 7
  • Notes on the Illustrations 113
  • A Note on Forgeries 117
  • Chornological Note 121
  • Selected Bibliography 123
  • Index 127
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