SIX

AFTER BREAKFAST I strolled out into the market-place. It was a lovely morning, kind of cool and still, with a pale yellow light like white wine playing over everything. The fresh smell of the morning was mixed up with the smell of my cigar. But there was a zooming noise from behind the houses, and suddenly a fleet of great black bombers came whizzing over. I looked up at them. They seemed to be bang overhead.

The next moment I heard something. And at the same moment, if you'd happened to be there, you'd have seen an interesting instance of what I believe is called conditioned reflex. Because what I'd heard--there wasn't any question of mistake--was the whistle of a bomb. I hadn't heard such a thing for twenty years, but I didn't need to be told what it was. And without taking any kind of thought I did the right thing. I flung myself on my face.

After all I'm glad you didn't see me. I don't suppose I looked dignified. I was flattened out on the pavement like a rat when it squeezes under a door. Nobody else had been half as prompt. I'd acted so quickly that in the split second while the bomb was whistling down I even had time to be

-261-

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Coming Up for Air
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • 1 1
  • One 3
  • Two 11
  • Three 19
  • Four 25
  • II 37
  • One 39
  • Two 47
  • Three 64
  • Four 77
  • Five - Fishing! 93
  • Six 102
  • Seven 106
  • Eight 129
  • Nine 145
  • Ten 154
  • III 167
  • One 169
  • Three 202
  • IV 207
  • One 209
  • Three 232
  • Four 241
  • Five 249
  • Six 261
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