Comparative Politics of North Africa: Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia

By John P. Entelis | Go to book overview

ALGERIA

POSTINDEPENDENCE POLITICS

THE SIGNING OF THE EVIAN ACCORDS with France in March 1962, spelled the successful conclusion of a bloody, revolutionary war that had lasted nearly eight years. Yet the surface unity that marked the FLN's ( Front de Libération Nationale) military and diplomatic efforts broke down immediately at independence, a time which witnessed a vicious struggle for power among contending groups.

All the intrinsically fissiparous forces which had been accommodated within the FLN were unleashed once the principal goal of independence had been achieved. The three major contestants for power were the provisional government ( Gouvernement Provisoire de la République Algérienne or GPRA), the wilaya commands (the Algerian commando units who fought within the country against the French and who were organized into six military operational zones or wilayas), and the army of the frontier or external army (the Armée de Libération Nationale or ALN, the established revolutionary army from 1954 to 1962 which was stationed in Morocco and Tunisia).

At issue were wartime misdemeanors, ideology, ethnic and clan ties, loyalties to specific individuals, and competing perspectives on the nature of post-independence Algerian society. At stake was the very center of political power in this society. The absence of mutual trust and confidence, a hall-

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Comparative Politics of North Africa: Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Morocco 45
  • Algeria 85
  • Tunisia 127
  • Bibliography 181
  • Index 191
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