Rienzi: The Last of the Roman Tribunes

By Edward Bulwer Lytton; L. W. Zeigler | Go to book overview

BOOK VIII
THE GRAND COMPANY

" Montrealnourrissoit de plus vastes projets.... il donnoit à sa campagnie un gouvernement régulier. . . . . Par cette discipline il faisoit régner l'abondance dans son camp: les gens de guerre ne parloient, en Italie, que des richesses qu'on acquéroit à son service." -- SISMONDI, Hist. des Républiques Italiennes, tom. vi. c. 42.

" Montreal cherished more vast designs...he subjected his company to a regular system of government. .... By means of this discipline he kept his camp abundantly supplied, and military adventurers in Italy talked of nothing but the wealth won in his service." -- SISMONDI'S Hist. of Ital. Republics.


CHAPTER I
THE ENCAMPMENT

It was a most lovely day, in the very glow and meridian of an Italian summer, when a small band of horsemen were seen winding a hill which commanded one of the fairest landscapes of Tuscany. At their head was a Cavalier in a complete suit of chain armour, the links of which were so fine, that they resembled a delicate and curious network, but so strongly compacted, that they would have resisted spear or sword no less effectually than the heaviest corselet, while adapting themselves exactly and with ease to every movement of the light and graceful shape of the rider. He wore a hat of dark green velvet shaded by long

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