Rienzi: The Last of the Roman Tribunes

By Edward Bulwer Lytton; L. W. Zeigler | Go to book overview

thoughtful, acute; -- couldst thou go to Rome? -- watch day and night his movements -- see if he receive messengers from Albornoz or the Barons -- if he confer with Pandulfo di Guido; -- watch his lodgment, I say, night and day. He affects no concealment: your task will be less difficult than it seems. Apprise the Signora of all you learn. Give me your news daily. Will you undertake this mission?"

"I will, my Lord."

"To horse, then, quick! -- and mind -- save the wife of my bosom, I have no confidant in Rome."


CHAPTER II
MONTREAL AT ROME. -- HIS RECEPTION OF ANGELO VILLANI

The danger that threatened Rienzi by the arrival of Montreal was indeed formidable. The Knight of St. John, having marched his army into Lombardy, had placed it at the disposal of the Venetian State in its war with the Archbishop of Milan. For this service he received an immense sum: while he provided winter quarters for his troop, for whom he proposed ample work in the ensuing spring. Leaving Palestrina secretly and in disguise, with but a slender train, which met him at Tivoli, Montreal repaired to Rome. His ostensible object was, partly to congratulate the Senator on his return, partly to receive the monies lent to Rienzi by his brother.

His secret object we have partly seen; but not contented with the support of the Barons, he trusted, by the corrupting means of his enormous wealth, to form

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