Shaw replaced it in a different section. This game lasted for the better part of a year, and it says much for Wardrop's patience and zeal that the book managed to survive its author's failing memory. Though it shows a marked declension of vigor and humor, it was an astonishing effort for a man of his years.


15. A NEW ALPHABET

IN THE spring of 1944 I heard from a friend that the repertory company at Tunbridge Wells were going to put on Arms and the Man in Basic English, and afterwards I learned that it had been a dismal business; so when next I saw the author I spoke angrily about it, assuming that he had encouraged the vandals.

"Keep calm, dear Hesketh," was his reply. "A flop in Tunbridge Wells will not draw the attention of the universe, and does not worry me nor matter a tuppenny damn. A flop of the original version would have been less negligible. Assuming that the acting was presentable the experiment goes to show that the story does not live in Basic but does in Bernard. I quite agree. In any case I did not encourage the vandals. But for you, I should never have known of their folly. Miss Patch licenses these performances by the dozen without letting me be bothered about them. If I had known I should have told them they were damned fools; but I should have let them try. Why not? You don't suppose the play is a penny the worse, do you? I wish I'd been there. It would have been interesting to see how a play of mine would fare as pure story without any of my tricks of dialogue. Anyhow, if Basic can kill Arms let it die. I have read Basic versions of pages from my works, and not noticed any of the changes!"

Later that year I read in The Author that Shaw was making his will, and intended to leave his property to the nation for the purpose of establishing "a fit British alphabet containing at least 42 letters, and thereby capable of noting with sufficient accuracy for recognition all the sounds of spoken English without having to use more than one letter for each sound, which is impossible with the ancient 26-letter Phoenician alphabet at present in use." He declared that, if adopted, this would mean an unimaginable saving of time, labor, and expense, and he invited various Government departments, colleges, trusts, societies, and public organizations to undertake the job of inventing and propagating a new alpha

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
G. B. S.: A Postscript
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • By the Same Author: *
  • Title Page iii
  • To Eleanor O'Connell v
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Trials of a Biographer 1
  • I. a Back Number 3
  • 3. the Mythical G.B.S. 5
  • 4. Lies and Libels 8
  • 5. No Laughing Matter 13
  • 6. Sexless Appeal 21
  • 10. a Shavian Production 45
  • A Postscript 59
  • 11. Shaw Criticizes His Biographer 61
  • 13. Stella and Isadora 73
  • 15. a New Alphabet 75
  • 16. Playwright or Propagandist? 79
  • 17. Shaw Dictates His Obituary 84
  • 18. Pilgrims at Ayot 86
  • 9 Three Score Years and Thirty 88
  • 20. a Bardic Battle 90
  • 23. Bewitched 103
  • Aspects of Shaw 117
  • 24. the Man 119
  • 26. the Reformer 122
  • 27. His First Appearance 125
  • 28. an Obituary 127
  • 29. the Modern Methuselah 133
  • Index 135
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 140

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.