A Political History of Japan during the Meiji Era, 1867-1912

By Walter Wallace McLaren | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV
THE POLITICAL SYSTEM IN JAPAN

THE complete domination of Japan's political system by a military oligarchy is the most significant fact in the history of the later years of Meiji. Though an oligarchy it is true had ruled the nation throughout the whole of the modern era, until 1889 the development of the machinery of government, central and local, was the main interest of the ruling clique. With the promulgation of the Constitution and the other organic laws, prescribing the extent to which the popular element was to be admitted to a share in the control of the affairs of state, the constructive work of the civil oligarchy was completed. When in 1890 the Diet met for the first time, Japan stood at what seemed a parting of the ways. One road apparently led to popular government, the other to a perpetuation of the powers of the oligarchs. For four years both of the opposing sections in the Diet, the party politicians and the Government, strove to make progress, but in vain. Ito's institutions as embodied in the Constitution and the Law of the Houses proved impracticable. The Diet's powers of consent to legislation were too meagre to enable the parties to advance, and yet they were extensive enough to hamper the Government effectually. The oligarchy could no longer keep the nation interested in civil progress without making further concessions to the parties, thereby endangering its primacy in the State, nor was it possible to stand still for ever at the meeting of the ways. To amend the Constitution to the extent of abolishing the Diet was not possible, and to hand

-352-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Political History of Japan during the Meiji Era, 1867-1912
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 384

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.