Algeria: The Revolution Institutionalized

By John P. Entelis | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE BOOK AND AUTHOR

After 124 years of intensive colonial rule and nearly 8 years of revolutionary warfare, Algeria emerged in a state of total economic decrepitude and political backwardness. Yet in the two decades since regaining its national independence in 1962, the country has achieved a remarkable degree of political stability and economic growth. Fueled by extensive gas and oil reserves, Algeria embarked on a massive industrialization program that has enabled it to reach a level of development placing it among the more advanced of the newly industrializing states of the Southern Hemisphere. Political life has been institutionalized under a presidential system rooted in a single party organization, the armed forces, and a burgeoning technocratic class. This book traces the shape of Algeria's revolutionary experience through an analysis of the country's culture, history, economy, politics, and foreign policy.

In foreign affairs, Algeria continues to maintain a militant diplomatic posture on most issues affecting North-South relations, espousing an ideology of revolutionary socialism and giving moral and material support to Third World movements for national liberation. In its bilateral relations with the Western industrialized world, Algeria pursues pragmatic, businesslike exchanges that give balance and perspective to its otherwise heady ideological pronouncements on a wide range of global issues. Despite increasing domestic problems related to high inflation, unemployment, corruption, and political authoritarianism, Algeria has achieved a level of development that, in combination with its avant-garde stature in world affairs, makes the country one of the most significant actors in international diplomacy, oil politics, North-South and South-South relations, revolutionary social transformation, and global efforts toward the creation of a new international economic order.

John P. Entelis is professor of political science and codirector of the Middle East Studies Program at Fordham University. He has been a senior Fulbright professor at the University of Algiers and the University of Tunis.

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Algeria: The Revolution Institutionalized
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • PROFILES NATIONS OF THE CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EAST ii
  • ABOUT THE BOOK AND AUTHOR iii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • 2- The Imprint of History: Antiquity to 1919 6
  • Notes 34
  • 3- The Imprint of History: 1919 to the Present 35
  • Notes 67
  • 4- Culture and Society In Transition 69
  • Notes 108
  • 5- The Political Economy Of Development 111
  • Introduction 111
  • Notes 154
  • 6- The Dynamics Of Political Life 156
  • Notes 185
  • 7- Worldview 186
  • Introduction 186
  • Notes 206
  • 8- Conclusion 208
  • Notes 211
  • Acronyms 213
  • Suggested Readings 217
  • Index 225
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