Algeria: The Revolution Institutionalized

By John P. Entelis | Go to book overview

7
Worldview

INTRODUCTION

More than is the case with any other Arab country, Algeria's foreign relations must be analyzed in the global context. In the Maghreb as in the Machriq (eastern Arab world) Algeria has been the most active state in the politics of the Third World, North-South relations, and efforts at creating a "new international economic order" (NIEO). The country's relatively broad-based national capabilities push it far above Morocco, Tunisia, and even Libya in the North African region and beyond Egypt, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia in the Middle East area. Algeria stands at the top of the less-developed countries--in Africa alone in 1982, for example, Algeria ranked fourth in GNP per capita (US$2,350), behind South Africa ($2,670), Gabon ($3,860), and Libya ($8,510)--and can even be considered a global middle power not unlike Brazil's similar designation in the Latin American context.

Algeria is also involved in a wider range of issues and with a greater number of partners beyond the Middle East and North Africa than any other Arab country. Although many of these interactions are low key and businesslike, there is also the widely publicized impact of Algeria in Third World political-economic affairs and in petroleum matters through its membership, since 1969, in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

Algeria has one of the more developed foreign policies in the Arab world in that its interests--ideological posturing notwithstanding--are flexibly framed on operational case-by-case terms that are then backed up with sophisticated diplomatic and organizational skill. Within the Arab arena, for example, Algeria has successfully built a reputation for seriousness and neutrality in disputes among Arabs themselves as well as between Arabs and Iranians. In addition, without excessive moralizing, Algeria has moved other Arab states that are in and out of OPEC to an appreciation and understanding

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Algeria: The Revolution Institutionalized
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • PROFILES NATIONS OF THE CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EAST ii
  • ABOUT THE BOOK AND AUTHOR iii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • 2- The Imprint of History: Antiquity to 1919 6
  • Notes 34
  • 3- The Imprint of History: 1919 to the Present 35
  • Notes 67
  • 4- Culture and Society In Transition 69
  • Notes 108
  • 5- The Political Economy Of Development 111
  • Introduction 111
  • Notes 154
  • 6- The Dynamics Of Political Life 156
  • Notes 185
  • 7- Worldview 186
  • Introduction 186
  • Notes 206
  • 8- Conclusion 208
  • Notes 211
  • Acronyms 213
  • Suggested Readings 217
  • Index 225
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