Algeria: The Revolution Institutionalized

By John P. Entelis | Go to book overview

the goods they export to the capital goods they import from the North; and (3) utilizing an array of South-South exchanges and arrangements in the economic, political, diplomatic, and cultural fields to confront the North more effectively.

Algeria's NIEO orientation calls for more rapid economic development, increased transfer of resources and technology from industrialized to developing nations, and a more favorable distribution of global economic benefits. Other issues raised by the Algerians have to do with aid, trade, foreign investment, foreign ownership of property, activities of multinational corporations, debt relief for developing nations through cancellation or rescheduling, commodity price stabilization, and compensatory financing mechanisms to stabilize export earnings.


Conclusion

Algeria has consistently taken seriously its dual leadership roles in the nonaligned movement and the Group of 77, the informal body of developing states representing the Third World's call for a new international economic order. Yet in the three roles of identification, mediation, and leadership that it has carved out for itself, Algeria's overriding concern remains that of building a "powerful, prosperous and influential Algeria." Algeria's leaders pursue global interests not as a means of expanding territorially or fostering a particular ideology but in order to buttress an intensely nationalistic state system. Foreign- policy statements as recorded by Algerian leaders in their official documents and texts are all aimed at improving the national sphere and having Algerians gain mastery of their own destiny. The same leaders, however, continue to stress the principled character of their foreign policy, reflecting the fundamental dualities of Algeria's global orientation--an admixture of reality and idealism, flexibility and intransigence, pragmatism and ideology.


NOTES
1.
Robert A. Mortimer, "Global Economy and African Foreign Policy: The Algerian Model," African Studies Review 27, no. 1 ( March 1984), p. 19.
2.
Bruno Etienne, L'Algérie, Cultures et Révolution ( Paris: Seuil, 1977).
3.
See Bernard Cubertafond, "L'Algérie du President Chadli," Politique Etrangére, no. 1 ( March 1981), pp. 160-162.
4.
Richard A. Roughton, "Algeria and the June 1967 Arab-Israel War," The Middle East Journal 23, no. 4 (Autumn 1969), p. 437.

-206-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Algeria: The Revolution Institutionalized
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • PROFILES NATIONS OF THE CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EAST ii
  • ABOUT THE BOOK AND AUTHOR iii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • 2- The Imprint of History: Antiquity to 1919 6
  • Notes 34
  • 3- The Imprint of History: 1919 to the Present 35
  • Notes 67
  • 4- Culture and Society In Transition 69
  • Notes 108
  • 5- The Political Economy Of Development 111
  • Introduction 111
  • Notes 154
  • 6- The Dynamics Of Political Life 156
  • Notes 185
  • 7- Worldview 186
  • Introduction 186
  • Notes 206
  • 8- Conclusion 208
  • Notes 211
  • Acronyms 213
  • Suggested Readings 217
  • Index 225
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.