BROUN "CRASHES" CITY FLOPHOUSE TO STUDY JOBLESS

One of the largest bums in history, stylishly dressed in torn tuxedo trousers, a crumpled brown coat and socks into which holes had been cut with scissors, shuffled last night into the Municipal Lodging House, 432 East Twenty-fifth Street, so disheveled and forlorn that the hard-boiled attendants rushed to give him a plate of applesauce, the delicacy which is kept for the most downtrodden. Within an hour, however, a wondering group of attendants and hoboes had gathered around the large stranger in possibly the first political meeting ever held within "flophouse" walls.

Heywood Broun, Socialist candidate for Representative in the 17th Congressional District, had journeyed to the lodging house to study unemployment at first hand. He had planned to remain all night, but when he was recognized so often that he could no longer keep the knowing ones quiet he set out for home slightly disappointed, although much impressed with the cleanliness of the lodging house.


HOPE NEARLY DASHED ON DOLLAR

Afraid that admission would be refused if he were found solvent, Mr. Broun carefully audited the cash in his pockets so that, after paying the taxi driver, who took him to within a block of the house, he would have only a dime left. The first near misfortune of the evening came when Mr. Broun put his hand in his pocket as he entered the "flophouse" and found a dollar he had overlooked. With a quick gesture of a veteran hobo he dropped the bill in a corner, hoping it would be found by some needy bum and not by the husky policeman who was eyeing him suspiciously.

____________________
An earlier version of this essay originally appeared in the New York Herald Tribune on October 31, 1930.

-12-

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