THE ROOM ON THE WALL

If you have a house or a room to decorate in an authentic American manner; if you have an antique chair that needs reupholstering or a reproduction which you wish to place on the right kind of carpet; or if you have a more general interest in knowing how great-grandfather lived, go to your art museum and examine the canvases by old American painters. You will see all kinds of people--rich and middle-class, purse- proud and simple, ordinary citizens and heroes like Robert E. Lee--in the rooms they inhabited generations ago. Around them are their possessions, arranged just as they were in real life. Perhaps you will have the excitement of discovering the table in your living room duplicated in the vanished parlor of some long-dead worthy.

Sometimes you may be surprised by what you see in the pictures. Our ancestors did not have that hatred for color which has been imposed on their memory by the dimming effect of time and the vandalism of ignorant restorers. They were more likely to gay up a table with nice bright paint than to scrape it down to the bare wood. Nor was a consistent attempt made to be true to what historians would later consider the style of the period. In those years, as today, a piece of furniture was likely to be used as long as it was serviceable. Thus the decor of a room was less often a shiny novelty than a slice of family history; grandmother's chair, father's highboy, and the sideboard the present owner bought after he had made a killing selling beaded necklaces to the Indians.

No other source gives us so intimate and accurate a view of the American past as do the paintings our ancestors commissioned themselves and criticized carefully before they hung them on their walls. We do not have the formal arrangement of unusual and therefore valuable antiques which is the stock-in-trade of American wings in museums. The figures are not wax fugitives from department store windows smirking eternally over the clothes wished on them by some curator of textiles. These are real rooms inhabited by real men and women. Everything is spruced up, perhaps, as for a party, yet the elegance is elegance our ancestors them-

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Random Harvest
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.