INDEFENSE OF THE MALIGNED CITY DOG

My own city dog, Pye, is a cream-colored standard poodle. Her resemblance to a lamb is not lost on the six- to twelve-year-old set. Herself fond of children and also of being petted, she is likely to be surrounded, when we appear together on the street, with little people. Even smaller people as they are rolled by in their strollers, reach out fat arms and make a brave atttempt to say "doggle." If a glance at the mother reveals that she is smiling, I will call the poodle over to nuzzle the baby. The resulting screams of delight assist me in carrying through sometimes discouraging days. However, there is a darker side to the picture. When I am caught on the street without the dog, I am severely criticized and even threatened. It is fortunate for me that eight-year-olds do not come in larger sizes.

It is in the nature of children to love dogs. However, cities contain a surprising number of older people who hate dogs, often hysterically. Efforts are made to bar dogs from parks and apartment houses and housing developments. Perpetual pressure is put on the police to harass dog owners, and hardliners make no secret of their hope to achieve complete banishment of all dogs from cities.

To my view, these attitudes demonstrate how large cities alienate some inhabitants from their ancient human roots. Men and animals have lived together since the human race emerged at the beck of the Darwinian wand. During my own New York City childhood--and I am still spry--there were as many horses on the streets as automobiles. Policemen's horses were the pets of the neighborhood children. Horse droppings sustained a multitude of English sparrows, who enlivened the air with chirpings and the beating of little wings.

The domestic cats that are now housebound would then slink out at dusk to raid garbage cans, while in the small hours toms would serenade

____________________
An earlier version of this essay appeared in The New York Times, July 3, 1983, Oped page.

-306-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Random Harvest
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.